Drama 99-nen no ai: Japanese American Information

99-nen no ai: Japanese American
  • Drama Title: 99-nen no ai: Japanese American
  • Alternative Title: 
  • Status: Completed
  • Genre: Historical, War, Human drama
  • Country: Japanese
  • Published Date: 2010
  • Total Episodes: 5
  • Summary: 

    The story follows a family of Japanese immigrants who crossed over to America 99 years ago. Kusanagi plays both the young Hiramatsu Chokichi (later taken over by Nakai) and his son, Ichiro. When the war breaks out the Japanese immigrants face racism and segregation. Ichiro pledges his alliance to America and gets sent to Europe, second son Jiro stays back with Ichiro's beloved Shinobu (who he has a crush on) and tries to protect his parents' farm. Their two sisters Shizu and Sachie are sent back to Japan and have to experience the horrors of war, one in Hiroshima and the other in Okinawa.

  • Online Video Links: Click Here to Download 99-nen no ai: Japanese American

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