Drama The King Boxer Information

The King Boxer
  • Drama Title: The King Boxer
  • Alternative Title: 
  • Status: Completed
  • Genre: Drama, Martial Arts
  • Country: Hong Kong
  • Published Date: 2000
  • Total Episodes: 1
  • Summary: 

    Another film (possibly the first) from Douglas Kung's My Way Film Production, that odd company who make HK films the way they used to be made 10-15 years ago, but which never actually get released in Hong Kong. The King Boxer shares a name with two early 70's martial arts films, but shares a lot more with some later vintage films of the genre. Most obvious is Fong Sai Yuk, from which large chunks of plot are lifted, but the not-particularly-observant will recognise elements from Fist Of Legend and Tai Chi Master and Sammo's Prodigal Son. Well, original story lines aren't exactly a strong feature of the kung fu genre I guess tongue.gif Chin Kar Lok stars as the headstrong young (!) son of a business man who is far more interested in learning Kung Fu than business wiles, and joins the Yiyin kung fu school despite the fact their master was just defeated by their rivals and it is going to close. The main reason he joins them is because he fancies one of the master's daughters (May Kwong), and due to a misunderstanding (that he can actually fight) the family place their hopes on him to rescue their school. The style is very reminiscent of early 90's kung fu comedy on a fairly low budget. If it had come out in 1993 it would have been lucky to rate a 5/10, but this sort of film has been tragically missing from screens for a long time, and even a mediocre entry is worth some attention. I could have done without a lot of the comedy, which only occasionally manages to be amusing. I could have done without the various romantic angles too, as they're entirely lacking in substance or emotion. What I couldn't have done without is the fight scenes, which are quite refreshing. Not classic work, but offers at least glimpses the kind of choreography and genuine physical talent that made HK cinema a world-wide phenomenon. We even get another fine villainous performance from Billy Chow, for the true early 90's vibe. If you've still got any early 90's kf films to get through, probably go with those first, but if you've already seen all that's available and have been itching for something new, by all means do pick up THE KING BOXER. It ain't great, but it doesn't have a lot of competition these days and it could have been worse smile1.gif

  • Online Video Links: Click Here to Download The King Boxer

Download The King Boxer episode(s)

Other dramas you may like

The Boxer From Shantung
The Boxer From Shantung

Leaving the poverty of his life in Shantung to seek fortune in Shanghai, The Boxer is instead drawn into a world of corruption, gang warfare and evil... Where his only protection is his famed fighting technique.

The King Boxer
The King Boxer

Another film (possibly the first) from Douglas Kung's My Way Film Production, that odd company who make HK films the way they used to be made 10-15 years ago, but which never actually get released in Hong Kong. The King Boxer shares a name with two early 70's martial arts films, but shares a lot more with some later vintage films of the genre. Most obvious is Fong Sai Yuk, from which large chunks of plot are lifted, but the not-particularly-observant will recognise elements from Fist Of Legend and Tai Chi Master and Sammo's Prodigal Son. Well, original story lines aren't exactly a strong feature of the kung fu genre I guess tongue.gif Chin Kar Lok stars as the headstrong young (!) son of a business man who is far more interested in learning Kung Fu than business wiles, and joins the Yiyin kung fu school despite the fact their master was just defeated by their rivals and it is going to close. The main reason he joins them is because he fancies one of the master's daughters (May Kwong), and due to a misunderstanding (that he can actually fight) the family place their hopes on him to rescue their school. The style is very reminiscent of early 90's kung fu comedy on a fairly low budget. If it had come out in 1993 it would have been lucky to rate a 5/10, but this sort of film has been tragically missing from screens for a long time, and even a mediocre entry is worth some attention. I could have done without a lot of the comedy, which only occasionally manages to be amusing. I could have done without the various romantic angles too, as they're entirely lacking in substance or emotion. What I couldn't have done without is the fight scenes, which are quite refreshing. Not classic work, but offers at least glimpses the kind of choreography and genuine physical talent that made HK cinema a world-wide phenomenon. We even get another fine villainous performance from Billy Chow, for the true early 90's vibe. If you've still got any early 90's kf films to get through, probably go with those first, but if you've already seen all that's available and have been itching for something new, by all means do pick up THE KING BOXER. It ain't great, but it doesn't have a lot of competition these days and it could have been worse smile1.gif

Masquerade 2012
Masquerade 2012

King Gwanghae (Lee Byung-Hun) has been the King for the past 8 years. He now suspects that someone within the royal court is attempting to poison him. In response, King Gwanghae orders his councilor Heo Gyun (Ryoo Seung-Ryong) to find someone that looks like him to sit in his throne. Heo Gyun then comes across a clown named Ha-Sun (Lee Byung-Hun), who performs lewd shows in front of drunken noblemen. Ha-Sun indeed strongly resembles King Gwanghae and is even able to imitate the way King Gwanghae speaks. Heo Gyun takes Ha-Sun to the royal palace without giving any explanations. At night, Ha-Sun takes the King's seat, while the King slips away to his mistress's home. A short time later, King Gwanghae collapses and is taken to a safe house. Meanwhile, Ha-Sun continues his ruse as the King until the King can recover. Slowly, Ha-Sun's own personality comes out and the people in the King's inner court notice the changes. The King appears more humane to those around him and far less volatile. While Ha-Sun's true voice comes out, enemies within the King's inner circle plan their next move.

Great King Sejong
Great King Sejong

This drama is about the life of the fourth king of the Joseon Dynasty of Korea, King Sejong who is considered the greatest king in Korean history for creating Hangul, the Korean alphabet and having many skilled followers such as Jang Yeong-sil. The Great King Sejong is a full scale politic drama describing how King Sejong and his loyal retainers cooperate and contrive to make his dynasty a better place. While King Sejong was in throne, the Chosun Dynasty enjoyed the most fortunate and happy age ever.

King Naresuan 3
King Naresuan 3

The legend of King Naresuan continues with this third of five chapters and tells the story of King Naresuan, Thai’s chivalric king and warrior in the Ayutthaya era who fought against the invasion of Burmese troops that wanted to overpower the Ayothaya Kingdom.

100 Yen Love
100 Yen Love

Ichiko (Sakura Ando) lives at her parents' home. She rarely hangs out with other people. Things change when her younger sister divorces and moves back with her child. Ichiko and her sister's relationship goes bad, causing Ichiko to move out and live alone. What brings happiness to Ichiko is to watch a middle-aged boxer (Hirofumi Arai) practice at a boxing gym. The boxing gym is located between the 100 yen shop where she works and her home. One day, Ichiko and the middle-aged boxer meet and they begin to live together.